Book Review: Bad Reception by S.C. Wright

51+eJclwuNL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_ Synopsis: Listening to your parents is hard work. As a teenager, you’re always right, of course, but to them everything you do comes up short. Kana is nearing the end of her teenage years and is already a young woman. With no career prospects, no goals in life, she just can’t seem to attain her family’s expectations. On her nineteenth birthday, an accident caused by her own shortcomings causes a domino effect of chaos turning her life from boring and mundane to terrifying and supernatural. Kidnapped by a vampire and her chauffeur, she ends up the hostage of a host of strange creatures: Chloe, a mild mannered Cajun vampire. Vincent, a Welsh werewolf with a penchant for piracy and a history of drug abuse. Gabriella, a Spanish immortal who cannot die, and her daughter, a shapeshifter. Will she finally find her way back home to her family? Or is family more than blood and kin?

Review: Bad Reception by S.C. Wright isn’t usually the type of fiction that I read. Albeit the synopsis was interesting: a vampire, a werewolf, an immortal, and a shapeshifter? Who wouldn’t raise a brow at that cast of characters?

S.C. Wright captured my interest in the first chapter. We meet Kana and her son Michael, on a train headed into the “unknown.” She’s having a rough time managing her son until she notices a gentleman in the car with her. After introducing herself to him (Theodore Schmidt), the tale truly begins. The circumstances for Kana being on this particular train are interesting, and that’s what greets us in the first chapter.

She begins telling Theodore (in exchange for something she wants) about why she is traveling alone in such a foreign place with a toddler. As is mentioned in the blurb, Kana is miserable at home. She feels unloved and unappreciated by her mother and sister. This goes to the extreme, but is indented to help you understand more of Kana’s reactions to certain situations.

An unfortunate accident on her 19th birthday sets a world-wind of events into motion. Her kidnapping by a vampire and an immortal is only the beginning. Meeting the werewolf and similarly fascinating characters propels this book forward. Each has their own backstory, and we learn more of why they respond to Kana in different ways.

It’s difficult to write this review without giving away any of the more intricate details. Suffice it to say, Kana ends up in a situation that she could’ve never dreamed of with a group of “people” only thought of as imaginary.

Parts of the story are a bit jumpy as well as some of the slang. Bad Reception is an interesting tale for young adult readers. I found myself laughing in a few areas and saddened in others. The cast of characters isn’t vast, but they’re fairly well-developed. However, I would’ve liked a more in-depth explanation or showing of certain characters unique abilities. That would’ve definitely made the story more enthralling. I would recommend this book for YA readers. There’s a bit of a language, but it isn’t overly used. The book needs some editing, but that did nothing to take away from my experience.

Book Review: Dragonblood Throne by Tom Fallwell

Dragon Blood
Synopsis: Orphaned as a young child and growing up alone in the forest, Delina lives a life of isolation; her only companion a saber-toothed panther. Her strange eyes frighten those she occasionaly encounters, so she keeps to herself, until a young, wounded warrior ends up at her doorstep. As she nurses him back to health, she discovers she is more than just a young woman with unusual eyes, she is a dragonblood, destined to become the ruler of Almar.

Now hunted by the dark sorcerer who murdered her father, usurped his throne, and killed all her kin, she must find out how she can release the essence of the dragon inside her to defeat him. Everything depends upon her willingness to embrace her legacy and reclaim the Dragon Throne.

Review: Dragonblood Throne Legacy by Tom Fallwell was a very enjoyable fantasy novel. Delina’s character was well-written as were her motivations for multiple decisions she made throughout the story.

After being isolated for most of her life, she struggles to trust a young warrior that she’d nursed back to health. Although she feels an attraction (beyond physical) to him, her dealings with others makes her extremely cautious. With an unknown past and mysterious eyes, she’s been labeled a witch, and lost most of her family due to the same. Her only companion is a saber toothed panther (Morlok) who has protected her since she was a child.

Once Merrick convinces Delina of impending dangers, she journeys with him and learns more about herself and her family. Not only is she a dragonblood, she’s the rightful ruler of Almar. Now, she must choose to embrace her heritage and become who/what she’s meant to be, or she can reject that heritage and succumb to the forces of Kargoth: the malefic usurper who murdered her father.

Dragonblood Throne Legacy is full of magic, fantastical creatures, and intrigue. There were a few places that caused my brow to raise, but the story as a whole is a good one. All of the expected fantasy elements are present with some new creatures called Malcoraths as well. Author Fallwell redefines what a dragon is, and entwines those aspects into a forward-moving plot.

Being a lover of characterization, I’m always searching for “why” a character displays certain behaviors. I never truly understood Kargoth’s motivations for his abominable acts, but that didn’t take away from my reading enjoyment.

Easily 4.5 stars and recommended for fantasy lovers: young and old.

Book Review: Casting in Stone by Morgan Smith

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Synopsis: They said ill winds blew at her back. They said she was cursed, a hex, a jinx, a hissing in the dark. And it was true: everywhere she went, no matter what she did, misfortune seemed to follow in her wake. But that, of course, wasn’t the worst of it.

The evil that seemed to track Caoimhe throughout her life had caused so many tragedies. She fled her old life, trying to lose herself in anonymity , but the unholy circumstances of her birth, and the machinations of those who sought to use her existence to further their own schemes followed her still. Can she overcome a long-dead evil and finally be free?

This epic fantasy tale of medieval swords and sorcery will appeal to young adult and adult readers alike.

Review: Casting in Stone by Morgan Smith is an expertly crafted tale set in a wondrous mythical world. The protagonist piqued my interest and I was immediately plunged into a story that I couldn’t put down.

Casting in Stone is told from Caoimhe’s point of view and starts with a devastating tragedy and mystery. Each chapter is more intriguing than the last, weaving a stimulating tale: the mysteries of Caoimhe’s birth, childhood, benefactors, and a host of peoples spinning their webs of deceit and manipulation.

Most of the story takes place in Rhwyn. However, through flashbacks, we are introduced to different places, times and given greater pieces of the tragedies of Caoimhe’s life. Starting with the hatred of her parents and shunning of all those about her, save her grandfather.

The characters are well thought out and described. I found myself empathizing and rooting for Caoimhe. Though, she seemed an unlikely hero, she was also an inevitable one. Her past was devastating and cruel, and yet, she survived by repressing any emotion. In truth, she may have had the greatest emotion and loyalty, especially for her sister, Meryn.

The level of intrigue is mind-blowing with just the right amount of twists and surprises to keep you interested, not frustrated. I read this book in one sitting and started looking for book II as soon as I finished. Morgan Smith has written a fabulously engrossing tale filled with believable and fallible characters. There’s just the right amount of magical/spiritual elements as not to overshadow the story, but to enhance it.

Book Review: The Olympium of Bacchus 12 by William Speir

William Speir
Synopsis: The year is 2614 – 206 years after Earth was destroyed in a natural cataclysm and the United Earth Planets Confederation (UEPC) became humanity’s new home. Spread across cluster of 8 star systems, the 22 inhabited planets of the UEPC thrived and were at peace for more than 200 years… until they came. In an unprovoked attack, alien invaders wipe out the UEPC’s battle fleet and all major cities on 21 planets. Hidden between two great nebulas on the edge of UEPC space, only Bacchus 12 is spared from destruction. The population of Bacchus 12, along with the survivors rescued from the other UEPC planets, must work together to defend humanity and deny the aliens the prize that they desire most – the mineral Olympium, which exists on Bacchus 12.

Review:  The Olympium of Bacchus 12 by William Speir is an engrossing SciFi tale set two-hundred years after the destruction of Earth. The new UEPC-United Earth Planet Confederation explored and eventually colonized twenty-two planets in numerous star systems. During the colonization, the humans alleviated sports and arts careers, focusing mainly on occupations deemed productive and supportive to their new worlds and mythos. This new system appeared to be functioning flawlessly until a devastating attack caused the UEPC to not only rethink some of their accepted practices, but also unite to defend the surviving population from an unknown enemy.

The Olympium of Bacchus 12 by William Speir is an enthralling novel with well-drawn characters. From the Administrator, Rick Douglas, to the director of the Advanced Weapons Division, Allan O’Connor, the cast is believable with great character growth throughout. One of my favorite examples of that was with Bret and Cindy, the Administrator’s children. Whereas they were a tad frustrating in the beginning, they grew into much more by the end.

I also thoroughly enjoyed the realization that even with the advancements they had made when developing this new structure, they had to adopt many past practices from Earth. The obstinacy and ruthlessness of some characters added to the controversy and suspense of the novel, keeping me turning pages.

With amazing space battles, an intriguing plot, and interesting dialogue, The Olympium of Bacchus 12 by William Speir was a pleasurable and refreshing read. I will be looking for more from this fantastic author.

 

Reviewed for Readers’ Favorite

RF_Official_Reviewer

Book Review: The Realm of Eternal Magic by Ted Lampron

51gjsJJtJPL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_ The Synopsis: Thirteen-year-old Bonnie is stranded with two boys on a mysterious island in the Forgotten Sea and their only chance to survive depends on an eccentric recluse who lives in a cave.
The year is 1906, and scientist Nikola Tesla is building a wireless transmission tower on his Wardenclyffe property in Shoreham, New York. Nikola is nearly broke, and unable find financial support to finish his massive tower and fulfill his dream of turning the world into one global network of wireless telecommunications. In the interim, he works on a secret project in his underground laboratory, developing a new invention that will change the way humans perceive space and time. After months of experimental tests, something frightening happens, and he is forced to abandon everything, the project, the tower, and his Wardenclyffe property. The local villagers have no idea why the inventor left so suddenly, and for many years rumors persisted that he built a mysterious tunnel under his Wardenclyffe estate.

Over a hundred years later, three young teenagers discover the secret tunnel while helping volunteers clean up the Wardenclyffe property in preparation of restoring the main building to a modern day science museum. Deep in the bowels of the tunnel, the teenagers discover an old underground laboratory where Tesla conducted secret experiments involving the use of electricity to alter the mind’s state of reality.

The Review: The Realm of Eternal Magic by Ted Lampron is an engrossing visit to a magical world. This novel is perfect for the young fantasy lover with a host of fantastical creatures, lands, and three adventurous youngsters who discover a secret that leads them on an unforgettable voyage into a dimension or realm ruled by magic.

The Realm of Eternal Magic by Ted Lampron begins with the end of a school year and three best friends: Henry, Freddie, and Bonnie. When helping to clean up the Wardenclyffe estate, they discover a tunnel leading to Tesla’s secret lab filled with oddities, complex machinery, and a journal. When they decide to explore, their lives (and reality) changes in a blink of an eye.

After finding themselves no longer in “Kansas,” they are forced to explore their new surroundings in an effort to return home. While traversing this strange new land, they encounter a plethora of intriguing characters, one of which is the Spirit of the Forest—Enchantress Lila. She sends them to seek the help they need and while doing so they meet an undead, an ice queen, fairies, Strigoi, zombies, a robot named Dominus Rabota, wolventrees, dragons, werecats, and more. Like Dorothy in Oz, they are warned to follow the road and not to stray from their path. Evenso, numerous occurrences force them from their destination and add to the drama, suspense, and danger.

The Realm of Eternal Magic by Ted Lampron was an entertaining escape to a magical realm. Can the three find the “key” and Master Armac in time? You will have to read and find out. 4.5 stars, and looking forward to book two.

Reviewed for Readers’ Favorite

RF_Official_Reviewer

Book Review: The Survivors – Book I by JEG

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The Synopsis: Throughout the world “Gifted” people go about their lives like anyone else in this world preoccupied by their daily lives, unaware of their special ancestral blood line. There are less than a thousand such individuals left on this world. In an effort to attempt to “civilize” this world, the Council of Nine, a Federation of nine Empires occupying this quadrant of the galaxy, had sent some of its people to try and create a human being capable of overcoming their barbaric behavior by creating a new genetic pool with basic traits common to all Empire people: superior intelligence, and telepathic and empathic abilities. Their descendants, the Gifted, born of mixed parents (“gods” and humans) are now emerging on the eve of the annihilation of this planet’s civilizations.

On the morning of 10 April 2020, ironically Good Friday, a religious holiday celebrating the death of a savior, life on Earth would change forever. A nuclear holocaust provoked by an incompetent and feeble minded US President, triggers unparalleled devastation and violent climate disasters. The earth has been severely injured.

It seems like Mother Nature wants to cleanse herself of the human race. This planet is likely doomed…Gaïa is dying.

Their quest for survival is explored in this story.

The Review: The Survivors by JEG is a dystopian fantasy with real-world similarities and implications. The tale begins on Easter weekend 2020, when the ineptness of the American president set cataclysmic events into motion. Due to president “Prompt’s” decisions, other nations rise up and attack the United States, causing holocaustic devastation.

Through these nuclear attacks, mayhem erupts throughout the United States. Some states are completely obliterated, while rogues and militias wreaking havoc and preying on the weak and innocent occupy others. During this time of unrest, numerous individuals band together, being led to a central location.  Among these individuals are the “Gifted,” and they possess telepathic and empathic links with each other. We learn that the “Gifted” are actually descendants of alien/human ancestors bred specifically by a council of nine empires within the Milky Way galaxy.

The Survivors by JEG is an engrossing science fantasy tale with multi-dimensional characters that are interrelated. JEG slowly crafts each of the integral characters and their abilities (supernatural and otherwise) into this well-woven plot. We follow them through their various journeys to find this central meeting place while the Guardian (an alien observer sent by the nine) keeps watch over them. If they can arrive safely, the Guardian will rescue the remaining “Gifted” and those who travel with them.

I enjoyed this dense and plot-driven story. The characters are vast and intriguing as is the narrative. There is a slight cliffhanger, but it is the first in the trilogy. I look forward to reading the next. 4.5 stars, easily.

RF_Official_Reviewer

Reviewed for Readers’ Favorite