Book Review: He Who Leads by M.A.N.

He Who Leads

Synopsis: Amare, the new Chief of the Akachi clan, must find a way to avenge his father’s death while still leading the clan to prosperity and new beginnings. He will combat his way through Earth, Ocean, Skies, and the Stars themselves to lead his clan to the promise land. A true coming of age story is told as he battles personal demons, both physical and mental, to finally become a great leader for himself and for his clan.

Review: He Who Leads by M.A.N. was an interesting read. As a lover of fantasy and science fiction, I was intrigued by the author description. The novel begins after an attack on the Akachi clan chief by a demonic double-tailed lion. After the “creature” succeeds in killing him, his fifteen-year-old son, Amare, becomes the new chief of the tribe. If that was not enough to bear, one of the superior warriors challenges him after Amare makes an unfavorable decision for the clan.

While attempting to quell concerns within his tribe, he must also select a wife and find a new home where they can migrate and expand. This is not an easy task due to the other powerful clans in the area. He calls upon the expertise of his best friend, Ime, the leader of his warriors, Emeka, and his mother. However, it does not take long to discover another coup brewing within the tribe.

After selecting his wife, she introduces him to a powerful ally (or enemy) depending upon if he is able to gain his trust and prove himself a capable chief. But the immediate threats that present themselves take precedence over that uncertainty.

He Who Leads by M.A.N. is filled with unique characters with exceptional abilities. Numerous female characters are emotionally and magically powerful. That is definitely one of the pleasant aspects of this novel.

If you love battles scenes and magic use, this would be right up your alley. He Who Leads has copious, detailed magical battles as well as emotional ones. I would have liked to have more characterization, but I enjoyed the novel nonetheless.

A few things puzzled me. When the novel began, I thought that this was a primitive nomadic culture (they lived in tents—sometimes called abodes), and other than their Umoya abilities, used swords and bows. Albeit, once we meet Onye, that shifts. He begins speaking of anti-matter, teleportation, lightyears, hyper-novas, neutron stars, gamma rays, etc. I had to go back and see if I had missed something.

Another interesting element was the vernacular. At times, this pulled me from the narrative. I would not expect to see phrases like, “ain’t that right,” “doesn’t half-step,” “went down,” “yeah,” and the like. With that and the repetitive mentions of the same Umoya powers over and over, I did stop and catch my breath a few times.

One character that annoyed me was Onye. He is extremely important to the story as a whole. However, his abilities and arrogance were bothersome. I love strong characters, but I had to suspend too much belief for him…even for fantasy.

Overall, this was an enjoyable read. The cues for the POV changes and FLASHBACK changes took a bit more getting used to. Also, the author repeatedly writes an inner monologue and then has the character repeat the exact same thing aloud.

He Who leads was a good read as a whole. I usually look up certain words and names to understand why/if the author used them for a specific purpose. Of them, I was pleased to see that one definition of Umoya is: an immaterial force within a human being thought to give the body life, energy, and power.

I would certainly read more from this imaginative author.

Reviewed for Readers’ Favorite

RF_Official_Reviewer

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